What do professors do all day?

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The answer is here; Anthropologist John Ziker studied “non-random sample of 16 professors at Boise State University and scheduled interviews with them every other day for 14 days.  In each interview, they reported how they spent their time the previous day.  In total, he collected data for 166 days.”

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This entry was posted in STS Gossip, Teaching, The Profession, Uncategorized by Nicholas. Bookmark the permalink.

About Nicholas

Associate Professor of Sociology, Environmental Studies, and Science and Technology Studies at Penn State, Nicholas mainly writes about understanding the scientific study of states and, thus, it is namely about state theory. Given his training in sociology and STS, he takes a decidedly STS-oriented approach to state theory and issues of governance.

7 thoughts on “What do professors do all day?

      • heh, hinterland is one of my favorite terms but far too romantic for this left-behind part of the globe. Would be a good place for studying the ways in which decay/collapse don’t register with the people who live in the midst of them, as our social-safety-net, bridges, sewers, roads, etc, erode away we keep building new sports arenas so maybe some kind of field-of-dreams cognitive-bias/syndrome at work? we need our own diagnostic manual…

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        • HA! I had never heard flyover country (I had to look it up!), but I do know hinterlands. The point is dead-on; crumbling infrastructure, and doing something with/by it, seems like a reasonable and not-at-all apocalyptic view! When you say “diagnostic manual,” what do you mean?

          On Sun, Apr 27, 2014 at 10:09 AM, Installing (Social) Order wrote:

          >

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      • it was a bit tongue in cheek (I’ve been fighting against the pseudoscience of the DSM for years) but was suggesting that we think about how to frame (in a loose familial-resemblance kind of way) styles of (I’m also dead-set against diagnosing publics with pathologies as if they were persons/actors) living/planning/politicking that feed into or work against the disintegrations of our democratic/common infrastructures.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_resemblance

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        • I could live with that; would the idea be to make theories that are not so much “truer” than others (in the scientific sense) but to build theory (or component theory-parts) that are “actionable”?

          On Sun, Apr 27, 2014 at 11:37 AM, Installing (Social) Order wrote:

          > dmf commented: “it was a bit tongue in cheek (I’ve been fighting > against the pseudoscience of the DSM for years) but was suggesting that we > think about how to frame (in a loose familial-resemblance kind of way) > styles of (I’m also dead-set against diagnosing publics with” >

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