Teaching STS: Construction of Time and Daylight Savings

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In the “Teaching STS” collection, we’ve discussed teaching lessons (with some resources) about the social construction of time a number of times related to whether or not time exists at all (with research from the Max Planck Institute), reflections on the notion of aberrant time such as “leap seconds” (students are bothered by this one), and, even though when we write about the olympics, it is usually about derelict stadiums, it occurs to me that when the atomic clock was adopted and the length of the second transformed, “timing” at the Olympic games might have been an interesting topic to think about for students who imagine that the length of the second back in 1936 should be identical to the length of the second that Michael Phelps was swimming in 2008 (in Beijing).

Source: Teaching STS: Construction of Time and Daylight Savings

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About Nicholas

Associate Professor of Sociology, Environmental Studies, and Science and Technology Studies at Penn State, Nicholas mainly writes about understanding the scientific study of states and, thus, it is namely about state theory. Given his training in sociology and STS, he takes a decidedly STS-oriented approach to state theory and issues of governance.

3 thoughts on “Teaching STS: Construction of Time and Daylight Savings

    • nice link — there is a lot of literature in sociology, for example, about the links between capitalism and the artworld, much of which implicates that elites are, well, so elite that art markets are not particularly affected (read: strained) by ups and downs in the market because the wealthy do well in a good market and often better in a worse market. Cool to see such a different take on that link …

      On Wed, Mar 8, 2017 at 11:01 PM, Installing (Social) Order wrote:

      >

      Like

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